Red phone box – paintwork

Another slideshow for fellow phone box geeks! Carl at redtelephonebox.com is now putting on the paint;

“I’ve degreased the whole of your K6 shell & applied etch primer to the bare ironwork & filler. Once it had flashed off I applied 2 direct coats of Post Office Red to the notorious & fiddly glazing bars & other intricate places I cannot get with a brush!”

Here’s a full slideshow of the current phase of Carl’s hard work.

Kiosk restoration – door

The old teak door is now being restored. Carl’s commentary;

“I’ve now sprayed etch-primed the door & 2K (twin packed) the wooden teakwood outer frame in Post Office Red. This will seal the wood prior to rubbing gently down & repainting again – once hung!”

Click the images for slideshows.

After it’s dry, Carl hangs the door and adds an additional top coat to the roof.

“I’ve rehung the door on new hinges & re-aligned all ready for a final light sand before adding more colour! I’ve also masked off the outer roof dome ready for further primer & top coat…”

Call this number now

The K6 restoration continues (see phone box category or follow from the original post). Carl has now restored the replacement roof – here’s a photo walkthrough of him fitting it (more about Carl and the restoration business at his website).

Mine's the grey one in the corner - primed and welded.

Mine's the grey one in the corner - primed and welded.

Bring the mountain to Mohammed, as they say...

Moving the box into place.

Higher...

Higher...

..and higher...

..and higher...

...and higher still...

...and higher still...

Carl manouvres the roof into place.

Carl manouvres the roof into place.

On it goes...

On it goes...

A snug fit!

A snug fit!

And here's the view from inside - the cable channel for the roof light.

And here's the view from inside - the cable channel for the ceiling light.

Open the door, get on the floor…

30.04.09 012The phone box arrived in Norfolk at Carl’s kiosk hospital last week. First step – take the door off fully, and drill out the concrete floor, exposing the whole of the cast iron frame ready for sandblasting. Apparently they come up good as new, even down to the detail of the original symbolic Tudor crown (replaced in 1952 at the Queen’s behest with a more contemporary one). The domed roof is probably past saving, so Carl is planning on replacing it with a reclaimed one from another K6.

In a previous post I marveled at the detail of the original 1950s K6 install instructions (and the devotion of whoever typed it in to get it online). But Carl was, of course, way ahead of me – I feel very much like an ‘apprentice anorak’ in this world. He has a huge archive of K6-related documentation, some of scanned from the original 50-year-old paperwork. It’s an impressive archive. http://www.redtelephonebox.com/archive/

Blogging editorial note – I’m blogging four concurrent stories at the moment – the phone box, the studio build, the guitar book and the Widcombe song. To follow these as individual threads, use the ‘categories’ on the right hand sidebar – here they are as links.

Not enough love in the world

One of the backlit 'Telephone' panes, showing how bad the exterior rust has become over the years.

One of the backlit 'Telephone' panes, showing how bad the exterior rust has become over the years.

Here’s the phone box in its pre-loved state in Derbyshire, before a chap called Laurence aka ‘Kelly the Crane’ arrived to transport it to ‘kiosk hospital’ in Norfolk. My K6 is a Mark I (i.e. from the first batch, cast in 1935) and is a model ‘D’, meaning that the door is on the right hand side panel with its hinge on the right (I actually remember this from 1979 – it stood on a steep lane called Birches Avenue, and the door opened uphill).

There were four models back in 1935;

”Kiosk No. 6 (Mk. 2)”is available in four assemblies, for use under various conditions as follows:-
“Kiosks No. 6A”; door fitted opposite back panel and hinged left
“Kiosks No. 6B”; door fitted opposite back panel and hinged right
“Kiosks No. 6C”; door fitted on the left side panel and hinged left
“Kiosks No. 6D”; door fitted on the right side panel and hinged right

(From the GPO ‘erection instructions’ dated 1955. Stop giggling at the back, there!)

Yes it’s true – more Googling has unearthed a copy of the original Post Office engineering notes on K6 installation, dated 11th March 1955. Here is the text of the original document in full (and you thought IKEA instructions were complicated!). And this file comes from a website where someone’s collected decades’ worth of phone installation instructions. Can you believe that anyone typed all these in?!

BT, GPO & PO TELEPHONE INSTRUMENTS site.

Download the full K6 installation instructions (pdf). All hail to thee, Internet.

See below for a gallery of the K6 in its garden setting, prior to being transported to Carl’s workshop.

“I’m in the phone booth it’s the one…” in the garden

The phone box stood for 25 years in a Derbyshire garden

The phone box stood for 25 years in a Derbyshire garden

I’ve inherited a phone box from my late father. It stood, between 1935 and around 1983, in the Derbyshire village of South Wingfield where I grew up in the 1970s and 1980s. When the Post Office became British Telecom in the early 1980s, lots of the cast iron red phone boxes in the UK were decommissioned and replaced with the more spartan plastic & metal BT booths (coincidentially, Bath is one of the few cities that has maintained a few red phone boxes in public places – there were a few near the railway station very recently, I recall.)

Some of the rural phone boxes were sold off privately by local authorities (in this case Amber Valley Borough Council) in the mid-80s. My parents didn’t want to see the old phone box leave the village, so they decided to buy it. It then stood in their back garden for 25 years. In that time they didn’t do anything with it (ummm… not sure what you would do with a non-functioning phone box…?), so now I find myself owning three-quarters of a ton of 1930s cast iron.

Unsure of what to do, I Googled ‘Red Telephone Box’ and found, er, http://www.redtelephonebox.com/. This is a company, based in Norfolk, called Remember When UK – and restoring red phone boxes is what they do. I got in touch with them and spoke to a chap called Carl, who runs the business. He’s a self-confessed ‘phone box anorak’ who just loves his job, and he told me lots of interesting stuff about the history of the English red phone box. The business restores phone boxes pretty much exclusively – there are, apparently, enough phone boxes, and enough interested customers, to keep the business going – they usually even have a backlog of work.

The classic red phone box is called a K6. They were launched in 1935 to celebrate the silver jubilee of George V, though weren’t produced in large numbers until 1936. This particular one is, according to Carl, a ‘Mark I’ – shown by the casting stamp on the back. It was cast, as were most of them, in a foundry in Glasgow. The design was found all over the UK, but also, interestingly, used in Malta, Bermuda and Gibraltar (i.e parts of the Empire/Commonwealth). I won’t go on much more about the history of the K6 – there’s an excellent Wikipedia page with more detail.

Being more than 700 kilos, and being set in concrete, they take a fair bit of transporting. I’ll start the saga of the restoration – and the dilemma of what to do with the phone box when it’s completed – in a future entry. For now, here’s a photo of a 1930s GPO phone box installer. And you thought the Nokia 3310 was clunky…

K6 installation (early years)

A GPO worker installs a cast-iron K6 phone box in the late 1930s.