Music Technology, Bandlab and Berklee #apme2018

On the bus to the university this morning I introduced myself to the person sat next to me, who turned out to be John Bigus from my own institution (Berklee’s a great community, but it’s a BIG community, so it’s possible to work there for a long time without knowing everyone’s name). John is responsible for the PULSE free resource, available at pulse.berklee.edu, which is part of Berklee’s initiative to work with K-12 school age music creators and teachers.

John has been working with Bandlab, so there is an introduction from the company’s Lauren Henry Parsons, and our interviewer is Bandlab’s Michael Filson. It’s a cloud-based, free, 12-track DAW app (mobile app or browser-based) with 3.5m users across the world. It’s sponsored by the music instrument industry, which is why the end product is free for musicians – and a walled-garden version for students and teachers. It’s also part of a relaunch of SONAR’s Cakewalk.

Musicality and Creativity in Curriculum

‘Keeping Musicality and Creativity at the Heart of Curriculum and Assessment’

Presenter: Matthew Cossey (ICA Nexus / University of West London)

Matthew opens with a discussion of the role of curriculum in popular music education, noting that the skills musicians gain in Higher Ed are arguably much more important than the qualification. Like the industry, he says, we must be ruthless in prioritizing meaningful musical career skills, rather than focusing on those elements that are the easiest to teach, or have heavily established pedagogies.

Association for Popular Music Education #apme #songwriting

Conference roomI’m in Nashville, at the #apme conference, hosted by Middle Tennessee State University. Popular Music Education is still a relatively young field, at least in terms of having its own conference (launched ~10 years ago) and journal (launched last year). More about AMPE at popularmusiceducation.org. Conference schedule here.

Coming from Berklee, perhaps I’ve become too comfortable with the idea that everyone talks about popular music pedagogy all the time. A lot of colleagues here are from institutions that have a long history of classical music education, but have only recently launched popular music programs. They are often seen as mavericks in their schools, and are viewed with some suspicion by more traditional teachers and departments. So there’s a palpable sense of community here, and even during this first morning of day 1 I’ve frequently overheard the phrase: “I’ve finally found my people!”.

Eurovision 2018 – live music analysis blog #eurovision

 

Final results

[voting results entered at ~11.30pm GMT / 6.30pm ET on May 12th 2018. My predictions shown in brackets]

  1. Israel ‘TOY’ (2)
  2. Cyprus ‘Fuego’ (1)
  3. Austria ‘Nobody But You’ (x)
  4. Germany ‘You Let Me Walk Alone’ (4)
  5. Italy ‘Non Mi Avete Fatto Niente’ (x)

My predictions (actual placing shown in brackets):

  1. Cyprus ‘Fuego’ (2)
  2. Israel ‘TOY’ (1)
  3. Ireland ‘Together’ (16)
  4. Germany ‘You Let Me Walk Alone’ (4)
  5. France ‘Mercy’ (13)

So I missed Austria and Italy completely, but got the first two (albeit reversed) and predicted three of the top four.

Of the soft predictions:

  • The Danes’ ‘Higher Ground’ (my personal favourite) will do well, but won’t win.
    CORRECT. Denmark came 9th (of 26)
  • Finland’s ‘Monsters’ will be in the top half of the voting.
    WRONG. Finland were 25th out of 26!
  • The Netherlands’ competent and enjoyable US country-rock ‘Outlaw in ‘Em’ will get some votes but will be in the bottom half.
    CORRECT. 18th of 26.
  • The Estonian operatics won’t do well.
    WRONG. Estonia were 8th of 26.
  • The Hungarian metalheads will get crucified. Which will probably suit them just fine.
    CORRECT. Hungary were 21st out of 26.

Predictions

[Written at at 10:19pm GMT (5:19pm ET) on May 12th 2018, before voting begins]. As always, I’ll leave the predictions here permanently, and post the real results when the voting is complete.

  1. Cyprus ‘Fuego’
  2. Israel ‘TOY’
  3. Ireland ‘Together’
  4. Germany ‘You Let Me Walk Alone’
  5. France ‘Mercy’

Soft predictions:

  • The Danes’ ‘Higher Ground’ (my personal favourite) will do well, but won’t win.
  • Finland’s ‘Monsters’ will be in the top half of the voting.
  • The Netherlands’ competent and enjoyable US country-rock ‘Outlaw in ‘Em’ will get some votes but will be in the bottom half.
  • The Estonian operatics won’t do well.
  • The Hungarian metalheads will get crucified. Which will probably suit them just fine.

Intro

Screenshot 2018-05-12 14.56.41Welcome to the 2018 Eurovision live musicology blog, now in its eighth year. This site has provided live music analysis of the ESC final every year since 2011, previously during the UK live broadcast. Since 2016, the text has been written from Boston USA, 5 hours behind UK time and, this year, also the Altice Arena in Lisbon, Portugal, where the live show takes place.

Eurovision 2018 preview – top 10

It’s Eurovision eve!

[For any Americans who are unfamiliar with the ESC, here’s the background]

Image result for eurovision 2018 logoBack in 2010 I live-tweeted some song commentary as the show was going out. Since 2011 I’ve been live-blogging the show, with real-time music analysis and commentary, and attempting to predict the winners before the voting begins.

Since 2015 I’ve been in the USA, and for the last two years have had to pre-blog due to work commitments and the time difference, but this year I’m pleased to say true live-blogging is back and I’ll be sitting down at 3pm ET/8pm UK time to be live-blogging. So please go to http://www.joebennett.net at those times and refresh your browser after each song. I’ll be chord-analysing, BPM detecting and quality-scoring each song as we go.

Here’s a preview of the top 10 watched YouTube Eurovision song videos in April. I note that an early favourite was Belgium, who didn’t make it through the semi-finals.

 

New Music Ecosystem 2018 conference – live blog

No, the other Washington.

 

Photo by user ilka_paola, caption reads Amazing Guitar Exhibit at the Museum of Pop Culture in Seattle ! 🎸#guitars#guitarexibit#musuemofpopculture#northseattle#ilovemuseums#seattle#dtseattle#downtownseattle#washingtonstate#seattlewashington#exploringseattle#exploreseattle#tourismseattle#beingatourist#goldenhour#sunset#pacificnorthwest#pnw#walkingthestreets#downtowncruising#seattlelife#sunnydayinseattle#fallinseattle#solotraveler#solotravel#musuemgeek#citypass#seattlecitypass
Mopop Seattle. This exhibit is a very large guitar stand, which is arguably not stable enough for touring.

I’m in Seattle at the New Music Ecosystem conference, organised by the University of Washington Law School. It’s a gathering of music and law professionals, discussing the future of creators’ compensation, tech/music innovation, and copyright reform. [Grammar folks – I’ve now been in the USA for long enough, and had Oxford commas inserted into my copy so many times, that I have decided to give in and just use them from hereon].

 

On The Fringe (accessible networked music solutions)

Dan Nichols, University of Northern Illinois

ABSTRACT: Over the past several years, perhaps no single person has fostered collaborations with groups on the fringe of networking infrastructure than Dan Nichols of Northern Illinois University. In this session, Dan will explain how to reach partners with limited expertise and resources. Prominent software solutions like Artsmesh and Jam Kazaam will be explored.

IMG_0804Thus far, the conference has focused on high-bandwidth institutions with fast Internet2 connections. Dan’s presentation covers bringing networked collaboration to the masses, particularly those who do not have access to these network/hardware/institutional resources.

Dan begins with a description of Jamkazam, a free solution (that also offers a $299 hardware audio interface). After describing its features and virtues, he plays us a demo of multi-site bands jamming at SXSW 2014.