Your hotel… #cms2017

…may be nice, but does it have a live Mariachi band in the lobby? Does it?

http://latin.music.txstate.edu/

Online Tools to Promote Music of the Midwest #cms2017

Paper: Online Tools to Promote Music of the Midwest
Robert Willey (Ball State University)

photoABSTRACT: An approach to teaching a music industry class involving the promotion of regional music is presented. A variety of tools are applied, including cell phones, lap tops, web browsers, iTunes, streaming Internet radio, and Google drive, forms, maps, and gmail. Many of the class meetings are flipped, with students watching lectures and studying at home and working in groups during classtime. The class is modified in the summer to be taught online with more individual than group projects, and office hours performed using WebEx online meetings.
Ninety percent of the students in the class take it as a general elective. There is an entrepreneurial emphasis in which students explore their interests and apply their portfolio of skills in whatever major they come from to develop a project that fills a community need. Electronic tools help us reach outside our small-town environment, get practical experience, and develop contacts.

Robert begins by talking about his ‘graphic curriculum maps’ – which are flowcharts that describe the learning journey. His pedagogy of ‘Specifications Grading‘ is partly influenced by the work of Linda B Nilson. [Read more…]

21st Century Experiential Classroom #cms2017

The 21st Century Experiential Classroom: Music Entrepreneurship Through the Coleman Foundation Faculty Entrepreneurship Fellowship

Sean Flanigan Colorado Mesa University.

main_campusSean opens with an example of the ultimate entrepreneurial musician, citing Mozart as a portfolio-career musician (teaching, playing, composing).

A question: How can a music program afford not to have a Music Entrepreneurship track? All professional musicians (by definition) monetise their skills in some way, and Sean suggests that our curricula should have this philosophy embedded.

We now see an overview of the Coleman Foundation, the funding from which enables faculty to develop experiential learning for students [Sean is presumably a Coleman Fellow]. In Sean’s ‘Idea Challenge’ for students , he enables the development of student projects that are market-driven – they ask what outputs people need. When a need is identified, ideation, design, and marketing follow. Sean’s examples are not necessarily from music – he talks about engineering, products and services. [His goal seems to be to engender creative thinking rather than musically-specific entrepreneurship career routes… but maybe he’s getting to that…]

He now ‘defines the community’, using Colorado as his case study, citing various music activities, venues and projects near to his university, including his own El Sistema project, MusicSpark.

The session ends with a very productive few minutes, where audience members discuss with each other what they might do today to move their curricula forward towards entrepreneurial student activity.

College Music Society conference 2017 #cms2017 #sanantonio

2560px-alamo_panoThis week I’m at the annual College Music Society conference , with Conservatory colleague Michael Shinn. We are in San Antonio, TX – my first time in the city, and in fact my first visit to Texas (I can actually see the Alamo from the hotel room!).

Our first session today is a panel, chaired by David E Myers, entitled “Inclusion, Access, Relevance: Addressing 21st Century Higher Education Challenges through Shared Governance”. This is perhaps the biggest strategic conversation in US Music Higher Ed right now – the institutions know there is a problem, but many seem unable to improve student or faculty diversity in any significant way.

[JB comment – I have my own theories about this, and take the view that repertoire is the primary culprit; classical music is a European tradition, and it has not absorbed non-white cultures easily. Institutions still build much of their curricula around the Common Practice period, and then express surprise that the programs are less appealing to those from other musical/cultural traditions. The question is – which lever of change is the most moveable – faculty, repertoire, curriculum or recruitment…?].

[Read more…]

Constructing Narrative in the Contemporary Music Industries

Kenny Barr (University of Glasgow, UK)

Paying the Piper: Constructing Narrative in the Contemporary Music Industries

gi.pngABSTRACT: In the 21st century the digitalisation of every facet of the production, dissemination and consumption of popular music presents an immensely complex set of challenges and opportunities to creators, investors and consumers. Encompassing a diverse range of disciplinary and methodological approaches, this panel identifies and engages with a number of key narratives relating to ways in which popular music creators are rewarded for their musical labour in the digital age and the wider ramifications for consumers and investors. Each paper interrogates and critiques distinct aspects of these unifying central themes. The first paper scrutinises the issue of fair remuneration of musical performers in the digital sphere and the efficacy of stakeholder responses and interventions. The next paper presents an empirical challenge to the dominant binary narratives found in many academic critiques of copyright as a means of rewarding popular music creators. The third paper argues that the erosion of collective licensing in the digital age has potentially negative ramifications for the availability and affordability of music to the consumer. The final paper explores the contentious issue of ‘value’ in the world of music streaming and argues that a new paradigm for ascribing and gauging value is required.

Kenny’s core research question: How do primary creators experience copyright in the contemporary music industry?

Research methods: narrative-based interviews, plus hard data via surveys, plus industry data. [Read more…]

Public Interest in Collective Licensing #iaspm2017

Richard Osborne, University of Middlesex (UK)

‘Where is the Public Interest in Collective Licensing?’

Queen Anne

Queen Anne. Not even the implementation of a groundbreaking copyright act during her reign could cheer her up.

ABSTRACT: In 1841, Lord Macaulay argued that copyright ‘produces all the effects which … mankind attributes to monopoly … to make articles scarce, to make them dear, and to make them bad’. Popular music has witnessed the reverse. The music industries’ most obvious monopolies are the collection societies. Collective licensing makes music abundant (blanket licence schemes, in particular, provide unfettered access to music) and it prices it democratically (all music costs the same). Collective licensing has shaped our musical environments. It is the reason why, in theory, any song can be broadcast or played in public premises. It is being weakened. Artists, labels and publishers are withdrawing from licensing schemes for streaming. Entrepreneurs are proposing blockchain systems that will do away with the need for collection societies. It is licensors and licensees who have dominated narratives about collective licensing. Questions of ‘public’ interest have been focused on how much businesses should pay and how much creators should receive. It is the argument of this paper that music consumers need to enter these debates. If collective licensing is eroded then music will become more expensive and scarce.

Richard’s favourite form of music, he says, is blanket licensing! He intends to advocate, today, for the needs of the public. Are [copyright] monopolies always inherently ‘evil’?

[Read more…]

Fair Internet for Performers Campaign #IASPM2017

Ananay Aguilar: University of Cambridge (UK)

‘Negotiating Change: the Fair Internet for Performers Campaign’

Graphic

The Fair Internet for Performers Campaign

ABSTRACT: My current four-year research project focuses on performers’ legal rights. The study responds to criticisms to copyright law for privileging Romantic ideals of classical music that pay excessive tribute to the author. To overcome this asymmetry, the research places performers’ rights at the centre of the discussion. Drawing on interviews with performing musicians and record industry and government representatives, I examine these rights from a wide perspective: I take into account 1) the history of these rights, 2) how performers make use of the law in everyday practice and through case law, 3) how the rights are managed, and 4) the processes involved in changing existing law. I have found a systematic under-privileging of performers in aesthetic and legal discourse and practice. This paper engages with the fourth point by examining the Fair Internet for Performers Campaign advanced by the Musicians’ Union with international support from AEPO-ARTIS and FIA. By mapping the stakeholders in this debate and their differing strategies and proposals, I assess the timeframe and chances of this campaign to lead to positive change for performers. I argue that, ultimately, this battle is one of successfully harnessing and directing public opinion by persuasively narrating popular music: the major labels’ greatest strength.

Ananay’s project is situated, historically, almost 100 years after the origin of copyright in sound recordings. The research has four elements: origins, use, management and reform, and today’s presentation covers the last one – reform. [Read more…]